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. republican senator lindsey graham has revealed he says the death toll in u.s. drone war overseas. at a speech in south carolina wednesday night, he said -- his comments mark the first time a u.s. official has offered a figure for those killed in nearly a decade of u.s. drone strikes abroad. the 4700 figure matches the high end of an estimate by the bureau of investigative journalism, which extensively has covered the strikes. the news comes as the obama administration continues to stonewall members of congress on fully releasing the justice department memos explaining the legal rationale for targeted killings overseas. the white house agreed to a least partially disclose the memos earlier this month after a senate uproar amid the conformation hearings for cia nominee john brennan. but the new york times reports the administration has adopted a strategy of continuing to deny senators full access while simultaneously negotiating with republicans to reveal more information on the deadly u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the strategy appears focused on ensuring the white house has enough votes f
now!" >> i think it is a vital tool. i have been intimately involved with the condition u.s government has been involved in and i consider without a doubt it has been very successful as far as producing intelligence. >> as counter-terrorism czar john brennan heads to capitol today for his confirmation hearing to head the cia, we will look at his role in the government's secretive post-9/11 rendition program. we will speak with amrit sing, author of the new report, "globalizing torture: cia secret detention and extraordinary rendition." >> the american public needs to know what its government did. grabbing people off the street, flying them to secret cia prisons to be locked up, shut out, held in detention and subjected to interrogation, and many instances that amounted to torture. >> then radio ambulante and the power of radio. >> we begin at the world's busiest border crossing in tijuana. it is rush hour and a mass exodus into the u.s., each with a particular mission and a baggage to prove it. summer caring suitcases, others carrying school books. >> an spanish-language radio program
brain cells rather lives, call saying the -- causing issues. it is important to use that research to understand how to read change sports for kids so we do not put them to the same trauma. >> had games. a senate superbowl approaches, we look at the growing links between concussions and brain damage. we will speak with former professional wrestler and college football player chris nowinski, now a leading crusader to make football and other sports safer. longtime revolutionary. >> [indiscernible] writing about the life we live without having it edited by the system. >> as we mark the beginning of black history month, a new documentary premieres today about imprisoned journalist mumia abu-jamal. he will join us from inside prison in pennsylvania. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. in breaking news from turkey, at least two people have been killed in an apparent suicide bombing at the u.s. embassy in the capital of ankara. an official says the bomber set off an explosive device at the entrance to the d
they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items were all made by specialists who worked at the ancient maya city of copan. between a.d. 400 and 800, this magnificent city flourished as one of the major centers of maya art and culture. copan was built in a broad mountain valley on the western border of honduras. at its height, the economic system of t
establishing an important precedent, an important step in itself. it will allow us to supply a greater range of equipment to help protect civilian life in syria, and will enable us to give assistance and advice we had been restricted in giving before. >> the new york times is reporting the obama administration may revisit the possibility of arming syrian rebels after obama initially rejected the idea last fall. syrian refugees fleeing conflict are continuing to flood into neighboring countries at a rate of thousands per day. a jordanian border official said monday nearly 90,000 syrians have crossed into jordan since the beginning of the year. one of those refugees decried the conditions in her home country. >> our homes are all destroyed. we have nothing. if bashar al-assad once our country, let him have it. we came here after running between homes, trying to avoid the fire that rained down on us. if it were not for the free syrian army protecting us, we would have died. god help us. >> in the u.s., georgia is set to put a man did that tonight despite consensus among medical specialists is m
capable of language, creativity, and thought. the differences among us lie in our cultures, our beliefs, how we organize our societies and how we make our living. humans have populated every environment on earth. we live on the frozen tundra and in the searing deserts. we live in thriving cities of millions and in isolated camps of a few dozen. some societies seem simple because they are small and their members are self-sufficient and use simple tools. others seem complex because they have large populations and people depend on each other for food and goods and use sophisticated technology. in between, there is a range that fills the spectrum. all of these differences are cultural, learned behavior, the result of a complex interaction between our inventiveness and our natural environments. as we search for new horizons, our inventiveness thrusts us across the boundaries of space, into new worlds. this new view of earth dispels an ancient myopia -- the artificial boundaries of our states and the politics that often divide us. here is a vision of one planet and one family of humankind. bu
these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you read this number ? 21,000. you're getting these two a little mixed up from the example before. we earn our daily bread in offices, and we buy it in markets. but in many cultures, the household is still the most basic unit of society, where people spend most of their days, producing what they need to live and teaching their children their values and culture. anthropologist richard wilk. a household is an activity group. it's a group of
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7